Advanced Camp (CLC)

Cadets learn cultural interaction protocol

By Katie McGuire

Cadets of the CLC regiment 6 spent the day learning about cultural interaction as a part of their future army officer careers.

During their Cross Cultural Competencies training, the cadets attended classes in the morning and put their knowledge to the test later in the afternoon.  This part of CST is to teach the cadets how to interact with different cultures.

The exercise ranges from approaching a foreign country, how to interact and help, and keep the peace. This is important for all future army officers because the training extends to all branches and will be used in future global missions.

Garrett Gremminger, of the University of Texas A&M, speaks with an Atropia police officer during one of three missions at Cross-Cultural Competencies exercises at Tactical Training Base Densberger on Wednesday, July 9, 2015. The training enhances cadets knowledge, skills, and affects/motivations that enable individuals to adapt effectively in cross-cultural environments. U.S. Army Photo by William Kolb

Garrett Gremminger, of the University of Texas A&M, speaks with an Atropia police officer during one of three missions at Cross-Cultural Competencies exercises at Tactical Training Base Densberger on Wednesday, July 9, 2015. The training enhances cadets knowledge, skills, and affects/motivations that enable individuals to adapt effectively in cross-cultural environments.
U.S. Army Photo by William Kolb

Staff Sergeant Mark Minton believes this part of training is useful for all future officers and their careers. “The overall end state is that the cadets have a knowledge that allows them to adapt to an ever-changing environment. They need to understand the cultural sensitivities of different types of operations.” He said.

The morning classes taught the cadets how to gather information, fundamentals in leader engagement, use of an interpreter, and tactical training. After being briefed for their activities the cadets split into their platoons and practiced what they learned in three lanes called Area Assessment, Basic Detentions and Apprehensions in missions, and Key Leader Engagements.

In Area Assessment the cadets approached a village filled with Atropians, the made up country to simulate this exercise, and were then encouraged to interact and get tactical information. The platoon split and some cadets observed while others practiced. Cadets were to approach the Atropians and their police and create relationships to achieve their goal of getting information and keeping the peace.

Cadet Michael Johnston of Gonzaga University explains his take on training. “In this situation we engage unfamiliar territory and build relationships quickly to reduce opposition in our mission,” he said. They then took notes on their experiences.

In Basic Detentions the cadets learned the initial interaction and how to approach different situations like searching and finding weapons, and how to get information.

Finally, the cadets learned how to engage with foreign leaders in Key Leader Engagements. Here, the cadets got a feel on how to use an interpreter and what sort of conversations to have with leaders from a different country. Three cadets were chosen to sit with them at a table and learn more about their country, the problems they are having, and how they could possibly help.

Jake Webster, of Purdue University, speaks with an Atropia native during one of three missions at Cross-Cultural Competencies exercises at Tactical Training Base Densberger on Wednesday, July 9, 2015. he training enhances cadets knowledge, skills, and affects/motivations that enable individuals to adapt effectively in cross-cultural environments. U.S. Army Photo by William Kolb

Jake Webster, of Purdue University, speaks with an Atropia native during one of three missions at Cross-Cultural Competencies exercises at Tactical Training Base Densberger on Wednesday, July 9, 2015. he training enhances cadets knowledge, skills, and affects/motivations that enable individuals to adapt effectively in cross-cultural environments.
U.S. Army Photo by William Kolb

This event was a very important part of the CST because the cadets will experience this type of interaction at some point in their lives.

“I believe that it is absolutely crucial that they understand the topics presented here. It doesn’t matter what branch they choose, at some point all of them will interface with a different culture in whatever mission that the military has sent them on. All of these tools will prepare them on how to converse with people unlike their own on a variety of topics,” said Staff Sergeant Minton.

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Katrinia McGuire

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