Advanced Camp (CLC)

Cadets advance their training to the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear threats course

By: Brooke Durbin

FORT KNOX, KY. – Cadets learned how to properly wear protective gear to defend themselves against Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear threats (CBRN) while going through the gas chamber on June 10th.

 

“These are senior Cadets going through a sensitive site exploitation lab where they will try to identify the processes going on as well as what the end state is. They’ll be using some more advanced equipment like a JK, a joint chemical agent detector that allows them to find the contamination within the room and identify it for following forces,” explained  1st Lt. Michael Boyett,

Cdt. Ethan Fiero, from Boston College, prepares to strip off his mask in the gas chamber during the Cadet Leadership Course, Fort Knox, June 10. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cdt. Ethan Fiero, from Boston College, prepares to strip off his mask in the gas chamber during the Cadet Leadership Course, Fort Knox, June 10.
Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Ft.Lauderdale, Florida.

 

For some, they’ve had previous experiences with the gas chamber while attending basic training. Benjamin Gunzman, Burlington, NC, East Carolina University said, Going in I wasn’t nervous. I already went through during basic at Fort Benning, GA. However, I definitely got more of an effect this time. I took a deep breath and started coughing and that’s when they got me out of there. Coming out, feeling the wind in your face, arms and body you just feel very hot. It feels almost like you’re being pepper sprayed.”

Cdt. Aaron Reed, Virginia Tech, puts on the gas mask in preparation for the gas chamber, Cadet Leadership Course, Fort Knox, June 10. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cdt. Aaron Reed, Virginia Tech, puts on the gas mask in preparation for the gas chamber, Cadet Leadership Course, Fort Knox, June 10.
Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

For others, this was their first experience with the gas chamber. Abby Burgdorf, Belleville, IL, Wheaton College noted, “we have a couple people enlisted who have done this prior so they had said how awful it was. I was kind of prepared that it was going to be bad but I didn’t expect how painful the burning sensation was.”

 

“My advice would be: talk to people who have done the training before. Just mentally prepare yourself. You know it’s going to be uncomfortable It’s going to hurt but it’s a good bonding experience. I think it’s important to know the different aspects of branches in the Army. The Chemical Corps gets a negative stereotype so going in and seeing what they do, you recognize they have a very important part in mission success.”

After completing the training, Cadets learn to decontaminate themselves and react to various tasks helping them further their plight in becoming Army Officers and leaders of the next generation.

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Brooke Durbin

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