Advanced Camp (CLC)

Cadets receive green light to train

FORT KNOX, KY. – Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) 6th Regiment Cadets arrive at Fort Knox and go to Soldier Readiness Processing (SRP) in order to be medically cleared before summer training can begin.

Capt. Amber Johnson, Officer In Charge (OIC), oversees SRP, and says about 300 Cadets come through every day to get cleared.

“This is the next step coming into active duty or the reserve component,” Johnson said, “CLC training happens before they finish their senior year of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) training and their senior year of college. It’s is a very big moment in their ROTC career, because it defines their success in their future branch.”

Cadets with the 6th Regiment Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) wait in line to give blood to make sure that they are free of anything that might cause them illness while at Fort Knox, Ky. June 28..Photo by: Trent Taylor

Cadets with the 6th Regiment Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) wait in line to give blood to make sure that they are free of anything that might cause them illness while at Fort Knox, Ky. June 28..Photo by: Trent Taylor

Cadets will get medically cleared at SRP in order to train or commission. If for some reason a Cadet is unable to be cleared, they must return home to get a waiver for the next year.

Cdt. Mathew Booher, Eastern Oregon University, native of Hermiston, Ore., stopped at SRP to clear before beginning CLC training.

“I’m in the medical screening process for CLC. They are checking my blood for any pathogens or diseases that might render me incapable to train,” Booher said.

Sgt. Donald Schnedler, native of Columbia, Mo., was working in the lab to draw blood from the Cadets.

“We screen to make sure they don’t have Hepatitis A, Measles or the Mumps, and to make sure they haven’t consumed alcohol. We also check their Glucose levels, lipids, Cholesterol, and for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV),” Schnedler said.

Cdt. Landry Shaffer, North Georgia University, holds his arm out so that Spc. Lucas Franklin, can draw blood to check to make sure that Cadets are free of any diseases that might disrupt their training with the 6th Regiment Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) at Fort Knox, Ky, June 28..Photo by: Trent Taylor

Cdt. Landry Shaffer, North Georgia University, holds his arm out so that Spc. Lucas Franklin, can draw blood to check to make sure that Cadets are free of any diseases that might disrupt their training with the 6th Regiment Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) at Fort Knox, Ky, June 28..Photo by: Trent Taylor

Cadets wishing to branch into aviation also get screened at SRP, like Cdt. Ben Cerra, University of North Georgia, native of Edmond, Okla.

“I’d like to be an aviator, it’s been my lifelong dream,” Cerra said, “I’m taking a flight physical today. Right now I’m in the screening process, next I’ll move on to the labs, get my vision checked and a couple other tests to try and clear.”

Cdt. Sean Curry, North Georgia College, native of Dahlonega Ga., is also attempting to get cleared into aviation.

“When I first got to my school, I got the opportunity to ride in a Blackhawk. I got the opportunity to meet the pilot and the crew, and they seemed like a good group of people who had a very specific skillset they were able to utilize to help the Army,” Curry said.

After Cadets clear for aviation, they still have to be selected to go on to flight school. If selected, they go on to Aviation Basic Officer Leadership Course, in Fort Rucker Alabama, to begin training for flight.

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Emily LaForme

A student at Michigan State University, Emily is a Public Affairs Intern for U.S. Army Cadet Command of Fort Knox, KY. Emily has a passion for all things military, journalism, and MSU football.

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