Advanced Camp (CLC)

10th Regiment Advanced Camp Boosts Confidence and Team Skills

FORT KNOX, Ky. – Cadets of 10th Regiment Advanced Camp (CLC) traversed the confidence course and rappel tower July 21.

Cdt. Jon Lopacki, George Mason University, begins rappelling down the 64-foot tower at Fort Knox, Ky. July 21. Photo by Nadia Essien

Cdt. Jon Lopacki, George Mason University, begins rappelling down the 64-foot tower at Fort Knox, Ky. July 21. Photo by Nadia Essien

Both parts of the day took courage, strength, determination and confidence. Cadets rappelled down the walled and open side of the 64-foot tower. They took on the confidence course in squads consisting of nine obstacles, which addressed different strengths and weaknesses. Depending on a Cadet’s strong suit, they may excel at one portion on their own, but need encouragement from battle buddies to finish the next one.

Cdt. Mark Von Cappeln, Seton Hall University, said the “Tough One” was the hardest part of the course.

“Running around, getting sweat worked up was a lot of fun. We definitely learned a lot about each other’s strengths and weaknesses and it’s going to bring us closer  in the field for the next two weeks after this,” Von Cappeln said.

Cdt. Jon Lopacki, George Mason University, expected extreme conditions and difficult obstacles.

Cdt. Caroline Bechtel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, goes through the weaver obstacle on the confidence course at Fort Knox, Ky. July 21. Photo by Nadia Essien

Cdt. Caroline Bechtel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, goes through the weaver obstacle on the confidence course at Fort Knox, Ky. July 21. Photo by Nadia Essien

“But once I got out here, I found that most of the obstacles were really easy. Me personally, this summer, I’ve been training to get ready for this long camp so I found, for me personally, I could do almost all of these obstacles with no problem,” Lopacki said. “We worked as a squad and we kept on encouraging each other.”

The rappel tower posed a different kind of challenge. The height required Cadets to trust their equipment holding them 64-feet above the ground, and trust their peers, acting as the person on belay. Cdt. Angelena Garland, Norfolk State University, had rappelled before but it was still an exhilarating experience for her.

“I did it in Basic Training and I was excited to do it again. All those nerves came back, but once I got over the ledge and into the L-shape, it was pretty good. It was a really fun experience,” Garland said.

Cdt. Mitchell Freeman, Pennsylvania State University, scales down the netted portion of the “Tough One” obstacle on the confidence course at Fort Knox, Ky., July 21. Photo by Nadia Essien

Cdt. Mitchell Freeman, Pennsylvania State University, scales down the netted portion of the “Tough One” obstacle on the confidence course at Fort Knox, Ky., July 21. Photo by Nadia Essien

Cdt. Jasmine Parker, University of Michigan, said, “I was super excited. We were told last night we were doing the rappelling tower and it’s always one of my favorite things to do. We do it at my school every year and it’s always one of the things we look forward to. We’ve never done the open side before though, so when we found we were gonna do the open side it made me just that much more excited.”

 

 

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Nadia Essien

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