Advanced Camp

Bringing together the Army Family

Cadets from Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) 2nd Regiment meet their families during the Family Day on July 5, 2016 at the Waybur Theater, Fort Knox, Ky. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Cadets from Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) 2nd Regiment meet their families during the Family Day on July 5, 2016 at the Waybur Theater, Fort Knox, Ky. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

FORT KNOX, Ky. – Families of 2nd Regiment Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) Cadets gathered in Waybur Theatre for Family Day to learn more about the training the Cadets underwent before reuniting with them July 5.

The families were shown a brief virtual tour of Fort Knox along with video and photos of Cadets throughout their training.

Col. Matthew Ingram, Commander of Task Force Warrior, stressed to the families how challenging their training was,

“It wasn’t just the environment. They faced mental challenges too. Between 614 Cadets from across America, they had to build themselves into a team and work together … Then we put them into an active operation where they had to make decisions and live with the ramifications of those decisions; very similar to what we do in the U.S. Army.”

Lt. Col. Jimmy Kimbrough then broke down how CLC mimics actual troops movements from predeployment to post.

Family Day Coordinator, Jim Nepute, gaves a brief to families of Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) 2nd Regiment during Family Day on July 5, 2016 at Waybur Theater, Fort Knox, Ky. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Family Day Coordinator, Jim Nepute, gave a brief to families of Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) 2nd Regiment during Family Day on July 5, 2016 at Waybur Theater, Fort Knox, Ky. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Rhonda and Larry Post, parents of Cdt. Austin Post of George Mason University, recall conversations with Austin about his training,

“He said it was tough, but it was a really good experience … I want him to be prepared. Because he has a desire to serve his country after graduation, I think this real-life experience is what he needs for when he does become an officer in a year; he can reflect back on this experience and know exactly what to expect.”

Kimbrough answered questions by parents on accession and training during a question and answer portion as they waited on the Cadets to finish practicing for their graduation.

For Susan and Natasha Morris, sister and mother of Cdt Lindsey Morris a layover, cancelled flight, delay and six hour car drive later left them anxiously awaiting the moment they are able to see her.

“She’s going to Guyana for a month after this, so we’re here to see her, we can’t wait,” Susan said.

Jim Nepute, Family Day Coordinator, had this to say about its importance.

“Family day is important to the families because they can come and get exposure to what the Cadets have been experiencing for the last 30 days, the training they’ve received and the atmosphere in which they’ve received it. It’s important to them to meet the Cadre that have been training the Cadets so they get a firsthand look at what’s involved in training future officers. It’s important for the Cadets because they need to feel the support of their family, spend time with them and show off what the Cadets have been doing. It’s about bringing the picture of the Army family together and this is the start of it.”

About author View all posts

Sydney Davenport

Leave a Reply