Advanced Camp (CLC)

Cadets of 10th Regiment Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course) learn Tactical Combat Casualty Care

Cdt. Taylor Marsilio, Ohio State University, has a Robertazzi Nosopharyngeal Airway put into his nose by a cadre member during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) Training at Evacuation Area, Fort Knox, Ky., July 27. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Cdt. Taylor Marsilio, Ohio State University, has a Robertazzi Nosopharyngeal Airway put into his nose by a cadre member during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) Training at Evacuation Area, Fort Knox, Ky., July 27. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

FORT KNOX, Ky. – Cadets of 10th Regiment Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course) tested their knowledge and skills on how to save a life through Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) training at the Motorpool training area, July 27.

Tactical Combat Casualty Care is the basic training of combat care on the battlefield. The Cadets were able to go through an intensive course of training with instructors and medical specialists. They were able to learn how to take care of a casualty, how to treat a wound and the main three components of the procedures consisting of care under fire, CASEVAC and treatment.

“As they go through, they make sure that you can actually get to the casualty and then ask them can you shoot, can you treat yourself, and then you assess the wound as well,” 1st Lt. Boyd Williams, Observer Trainer Mentor (OTM) of Fort Sill Okla., explained.

Cdt. Mercedes Madlock (left), Tuskegee University in Alabama and Cdt. Jamie Adams, Portland State University in Oregon, try to feel their rib cage while learning about sucking chest wounds during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) Training at Evacuation Area, Fort Knox, Ky., July 27. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Cdt. Mercedes Madlock (left), Tuskegee University in Alabama and Cdt. Jamie Adams, Portland State University in Oregon, try to feel their rib cage while learning about sucking chest wounds during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) Training at Evacuation Area, Fort Knox, Ky., July 27. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

The training usually takes five days. However, the training has been condensed into a five-hour course. The Cadets must retain information in a very short amount of time to be successful. The instructors and medics were able to teach Cadets the proper ways to use equipment, how to treat casualties, different step to evacuate casualty and how to perform field care treatments. Cadets were then able to have hands-on practice with their battle buddies.

The Cadets were also able to learn about the importance of combat care throughout this block of instruction.

“Military personnel perform in very high stress environments, things tend to go wrong; so as future officer, it is really important to understand different type of techniques and procedures so that we can have the ability to perform on ourselves, when we are wounded or injured, but also inspire other men and women to also be able to perform the standard,” Cdt. James Vannorstrand, James Madison University, said.

Mentors and medical specialists have high expectations for the Cadets as they have acknowledged their future roles and the significances of TC3 training.

Sgt. Thomas Jamesandovas teaches Cadets from Advanced Camp (Cadet Leadership Course), 10th Regiment, Alpha and Bravo Company during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) Training at Evacuation Area, Fort Knox, Ky., July 27. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Sgt. Thomas Jamesandovas teaches Cadets from Advanced Camp (Cadet Leadership Course), 10th Regiment, Alpha and Bravo Company during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3) Training at Evacuation Area, Fort Knox, Ky., July 27. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

“We understand ammo, weapons; we try to win a fight, but how are you going to win a fight when you are taking casualties and people aren’t coming home,” Pvt. Jake Umphlett, 68th Whiskey Certified Instructor from Fort Carson Colo., shared.

During the intensive lesson of TC3, the Cadets were also be able to appreciate their opportunities to be training here at Fort Knox, as part of Cadet Summer Training, before becoming Army future leaders.

“It is a great experience. I transferred here from a different ROTC, so a lot of this is definitely new to me. And just having this kind of training environment definitely help me keeping up to speed and; gives me opportunities to understand what the Army expects of me as a Cadet,” Cdt. Raphael Mogollan, Texas A&M University, said.

The Cadres were very pleased to see their Cadets highly motivated and determined to move forwards with their vigorous training and achieve their individual goal.

“At the end of Cadet Summer Training, I just want to be a better-rounded person. I want to become an officer and be able to say ‘I deserve to be an officer, I deserve this position, the title and the respect that come along with it,’” Cdt. Matthew Freitas, Northeastern University, said.

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Linh Nguyen

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