Advanced Camp

Cadets of 10th Regiment Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course) Participate in Call For Fire Exercises

FORT KNOX. Ky. – Cadets of 10th Regiment Advanced Camp (Cadet Leaders Course), Alpha and Bravo Companies, learned Call for Fire procedures at the Training Support Center (TSC), July 25.

Call for Fire refers to artillery rounds. There are various types of artillery rounds, such as: high explosive, armor piercing, smoke, and illumination. The Cadets were able to learn how to read grids and how to effectively send call for fire messages.

“For Call for Fire, you can utilize it as a platoon to obscure movements, or take out targets. If you are doing a route recon, you can have preplanned target that you have established with artillerymen and call that in as a quick reaction to contact,” Staff Sgt. Brandon Allen, Observer Trainer Mentor (OTM) from Georgia State University, explained.

Cdt. Zachery Scott, Virginia Tech, learns how to set up a patrol base during the Call for Fire exercise at the Training Support Center (TSC), Fort Knox, Ky., July 25. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Cdt. Zachery Scott, Virginia Tech, learns how to set up a patrol base during the Call for Fire exercise at the Training Support Center (TSC), Fort Knox, Ky., July 25. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

The Cadets were able to use a Call for Fire Simulator, where they learned the six elements of the Call for Fire messages: observer identification, warning order, target location, target description, method of engagement, and method of fire and control. They were able to put their knowledge into the practice by going through virtual simulations with their instructors and mentors, as well as their battle buddies.

“We are using either grids or polar target destinations. We are using the bracketing process to gradually move artillery rounds to destroy the target,” Cdt. Rhett Bauer, Indiana University—Perdue University Indianapolis, said.

In addition to the six elements of the Call for Fire, the Cadets were required to memorize series of acronyms as part of their tactic communication training using a radio.

Cadets interested in being a part of Infantry, Cavalry Branches of the Army, or any combat Military Occupational Specialties benefit greatly from Call for Fire Exercises. However, the rest were still able to experience talking on the radio, which will be essential for their field training.

Cadets from Advanced Camp (CLC), 10th Regiment, Alpha and Bravo Company, analyze target locations during the Call for Fire exercise at the Training Support Center (TSC), Fort Knox, Ky., July 25. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

Cadets from Advanced Camp (CLC), 10th Regiment, Alpha and Bravo Company, analyze target locations during the Call for Fire exercise at the Training Support Center (TSC), Fort Knox, Ky., July 25. Photo by Wenqing Yan.

“They will just be able to critique, developed themselves and know the basics of Call For Fire so they can utilize it in the future. Some of them may go through artilleries or cavalries and they will be able to utilize the skills later on,” said Allen as he shared his expectations for the Cadets.

Some Cadets have had prior experiences with Call for Fire Training back at their home universities. However, it did not mean their excitement and motivation wavered. They were aware of the importance of their training in infantry tactics communication.

“I know the Call For Fire Simulator is supposed to be pretty high speed. We did one at my school but it wasn’t as cool as this one sounds. So I am really excited for the training today,” Cdt. William Ferris, University of North Georgia, shared.

As part of their Call for Fire Exercises, the Cadets were also able to practice setting up patrol bases for when they go into the field. All the basic skills and knowledge they have learned will be fully tested.

“When they are going to the field, everybody is getting trained the basic tactics. You will need to learn how to defend yourself and they basically learn all that out here,” Staff Sgt. Billy Marsh, OTM from Fort Sill, Okla., said. “I’m excited to see how they learn and how they react to it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Linh Nguyen

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