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Cadets train in properly identifying Improvised Explosive Devices

FORT KNOX, KY. – Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) 5th Regiment Cadets learn the importance of properly reacting to and identifying Improvised Explosive Devices (IED’s) in preparation for future leadership roles on the battlefront.

Spc. Sanchez guides Cdt. Cynthia Vasquez, University of Connecticut, while she uses a handheld detector to practice counter Improvised Explosive Device (IED) detection at Fort Knox, Ky., July 2. Photo by Sade’ Wilson

Spc. Sanchez guides Cdt. Cynthia Vasquez, University of Connecticut, while she uses a handheld detector to practice counter Improvised Explosive Device (IED) detection at Fort Knox, Ky., July 2. Photo by Sade’ Wilson

Sgt. 1st Class Carl Beuermann, University of Nevada Reno, is the Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge (NCOIC) on site and oversees the Counter-IED training for Cadets.

“Today we are conducting Counter-IED training, a valuable training point for Cadets who may deploy because they are the main threat that the enemy is using against us,” Beuermann said, “We’re showing them how to recognize the threat of IED’s in the ground, how to mitigate those threats, and also how to react using proper reporting procedures.”

IED’s are bombs constructed and deployed by the enemy and are made of simple materials that are placed in the path of U.S. forces.

“The enemy is using rudimentary components that targets convoys, U.S. forces, and even villagers if it can push their message across. It is one of the most dangerous threats out on the battlefield,” Beuermann said, “They are very common in the combat zones, they are super cheap, easy to make, and they are very effective against U.S. and coalition forces.”

The Counter IED site had three stations comprised of learning the five components of IED’S and how to detect them on the ground, how to navigate the terrain, and how to utilize handheld detectors.

Gabriel Morris, counter Improvised Explosive Device (IED) trainer, reviews the five C’s of IEDs with 5th Regiment Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) Cadets at Fort Knox, Ky., July 2. Photo by Sade’ Wilson

Gabriel Morris, counter Improvised Explosive Device (IED) trainer, reviews the five C’s of IEDs with 5th Regiment Cadet Leaders Course (CLC) Cadets at Fort Knox, Ky., July 2. Photo by Sade’ Wilson

Capt. Kris Lovingood, Columbus State University, Committee Chief of the site, looks for the reactions of a good leader during Counter-IED training.

“This is a leadership development, we want them to react. Correctly reacting means they are able take a squad or platoon and control the situation. They can identify the IED, get into a security posture, and figure out how to bypass it. We want to see their ability to lead that element.”

Counter-IED training takes place over the course of ten days during CLC.

“After they receive the training on how to recognize and understand how the enemy is going to use those devices, then it’s game on. It becomes force on force against the enemy, we also implement training with Southern Atropian Peoples Army (SAPA) forces. Over the course of the training, they’ll come into contact with IED’s and they’ll be expected to react accordingly.”

Beuermann believes the training at the Counter-IED site has been very successful for the Cadets.

“The Cadets have done a very good job with the training that we have given them, we have taught them to not make patterns, and they are utilizing the terrain to their advantage. In all reality the Cadets are somewhat winning the IED fight here at CLC,” Beuermann said.

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Emily LaForme

A student at Michigan State University, Emily is a Public Affairs Intern for U.S. Army Cadet Command of Fort Knox, KY. Emily has a passion for all things military, journalism, and MSU football.

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