Advanced Camp (CLC)

Get Ready, Get Set, Frago

FORT KNOX, Ky.- In a day that changed in the span of a few moments, the Cadets of 9th Regiment, Advanced Camp completed a successful mission the likes of which has never been seen at Cadet Summer Training. A day that began with nine hours of pulling security in a patrol base and continuously changing missions concluded with the largest force on force fire-fight ever seen in CST history according to Col. Kenneth Mintz, the Tactics Team Chief for Cadet Summer Training.

The Cadets of 9th Regiment faced an uphill ambush attack by local “enemy forces”, the likes of which required the action of the entire six-hundred Cadet strong regiment to fight back. Armed with over seven-hundred weapons, the Cadets were able to reverse back around the seventy-five degree slope to get behind the enemy. To gain this advantage, the regiment crossed through the local Asagi Village, in rural Atropia, the notional country created to optimally train the Cadets. Once into position they were able to force those who remained of the enemy to surrender, resulting in a successful mission. The Cadets were able to successfully navigate this mission with only fourteen casualties to their forces.

Cdt. Nicholas Guerra, Carson Newman University, and Cdt. Pauline Ovalle, University of California Davis, 9th Regiment, Advanced Camp, open fire with a machine gun on enemy forces who ambushed their unit at Fort Knox, Ky. July 27. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cdt. Nicholas Guerra, Carson Newman University, and Cdt. Pauline Ovalle, University of California Davis, 9th Regiment, Advanced Camp, open fire with a machine gun on enemy forces who ambushed their unit at Fort Knox, Ky. July 27. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cdt. Jennifer Messina, Berklee College of Music, assigned to Bravo Company, 9th Regiment, Advanced Camp, stated that it was the sudden change in environment that made the mission a success.

“We spent nine hours in security along the patrol base where we were set up, but we never fully relaxed. Ever hour or so we would get a mission announcement, and would get the order to move out presently, but minutes before the actual movement we would get a frago, and the mission would change. We were still tense though; we were ready to go whenever we needed to. The ambush was a surprise, but it didn’t take us by surprise.”

A frago, or change in orders or plans, is common in the field. Constant change of orders can be wearisome, the constant stop and go motion can create frustration in the Cadets, all of whom had been feeling the tension from the enemy forces throughout the day.

Cdt. Brooke Stark, University of Portland, Bravo Company, 9th Regiment, Advanced Camp, conceals herself behind a building in the mock village during an ambush attack by the enemy at Fort Knox, Ky. July 27. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cdt. Brooke Stark, University of Portland, Bravo Company, 9th Regiment, Advanced Camp, conceals herself behind a building in the mock village during an ambush attack by the enemy at Fort Knox, Ky. July 27. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cdt. Brooke Stark, University of Portland, assigned to Bravo Company, 9th Regiment Advanced Camp says that the constant change of orders can create tension, but it can keep you ready for the upcoming storm. “Its hours of sitting around and waiting, its like being toyed with at the start of a race. Get ready, get set… frago!”

Cdt. Brentten Wiley, Bowling Green State University, assigned to Bravo Company, 9th Regiment Advanced Camp, says that the mission was a success because of the positive attitude in spite of the frustration due to constant change of missions.

“Overall this objective was a success, coming into this you have to be ready at all time. It was frustrating at first but we came in with an open mind. We knew that as soon as we got the objective something was going to go down. We had to accomplish and execute our mission.”

 

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Ariana Aubuchon

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